Sexually transmitted diseases – STDs

Welcome to Clínica Sants, your trusted medical clinic for your STD Testing in Barcelona.

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STD Visit

STD Visit + Condyloma I

STD Visit + Condyloma III

TIME SPENT IN THE CLINIC: 30 MIN

CONTACT BY PHONE: 24/7

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Visit ETS

50€

STD Visit + Condyloma I

100€

STD Visit + Condyloma III

200€

TIME TO STAY IN THE CLINIC: 30 MIN

PHONE CALL: 24 HOURS

FAQ

1. What are STDs (Sexually Transmitted Diseases)?

They are a set of infectious clinical conditions. These infections are acquired by having sex (including vaginal sex, anal sex, and oral sex) with someone who is infected. They are also acquired, by the use of contaminated syringes or through contact with blood. Some of them can also be transmitted during pregnancy and childbirth, i.e. from mother to child.

Other names: sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexually transmitted diseases, venereal diseases.

Get in touch with us for STD Testing in Barcelona.

2. By whom is it produced? Which agents produce them?

They are caused by bacteria, parasites (fungus, protozoa) and viruses. Those caused by bacteria and parasites, can be treated in the clinic with antibiotics or other medications. For those caused by a virus, there is no cure yet, the disease is only kept under control with certain medications.

3. Can they be prevented?

To prevent STD infection, it is essential to:

  1. Knowing its existence first. At Clínica Ginecológica Sants we recommend you to visit a specialist. You can call us and make an appointment.
  2. Practice safe sex, i.e. protected sex or sex with protection.
  3. It is recommended to use condom as a method of contraception to protect against infection in a large majority of STDs.
  4. Know the signs and symptoms.
  5. Ideally, before starting having sex, couples should consider getting tested for STDs, regardless of whether they had previous sexual encounters with other people. However, certain STDs are asymptomatic and therefore difficult to diagnose such as the HPV (human papillomavirus).
4. What types of STDs are there?

There are more than 20 types of STDs, the most common are:

  1. Chlamydia
  2. Gonorrhea
  3. Genital herpes
  4. Genital condylomas
  5. HPV
  6. HIV/AIDS
  7. Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV)
  8. Syphilis
  9. Tricominiasus
  10. Bacterial vaginosis
  11. Candidiasis
  12. Crabs

1. Chlamydia – Chlamydia infection

What is Chlamydia?

Clamidia is a genus of gram-negative bacteria which belongs to the Chalamydiaceae family.

Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease (STD).

Anyone can get chlamydia. It is very common among adolescents and young people.

Young, sexually active women should be tested every year.

Most people who have chlamydia don’t know it. This disease usually has no symptoms.

You can spread chlamydia without knowing it.

Chlamydia is easily treated and cured.

If you do not receive treatment for chlamydia you may develop serious health issues.

How can I reduce my risk of Chlamydia?

The safest way to avoid chlamydia is sexual abstinence, or having sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce the risk of getting chlamydia if used appropriately every time you have sex.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted disease.

How do you contract Chlamydia?

You may develop chlamydia by having sex with someone who is infected.

“Having sex” means anal, oral or vaginal sex.

If you’re pregnant and have chlamydia, you can spread your baby.

What are the symptoms of Chlamydia?

IF YOU’RE A WOMAN

In women, most chlamydia infections don’t cause symptoms. You may develop chlamydia in your cervix (the opening of your uterus or womb), your rectum, or throat. You may not notice any symptoms, but if you have them, you may notice:

Abnormal vaginal discharge.

Burning when urinating.

Pain or bleeding during sex.

If the infection spreads, it can cause fever, nausea, low abdominal pain or pain during sex.

IF YOU’RE A MAN

In men, most chlamydia infections don’t cause symptoms. You may get chlamydia in the urethra (inside the penis), rectum, or throat. You may not notice any symptoms, but if you have them, you may notice:

Penis discharge.

Burning when urinating.

Burning or itching around the opening of the penis.

How do I know if I have Chlamydia?

At Clínica Ginecológica Sants after being examinated and in case od suspicion of being infected with chlamydia, we will carry out a specific test for your diagnosis. This test is easy and painless.

When should I have an exam?

IF YOU’RE A WOMAN

Chlamydia should be tested at least once a year if you:

– Are under the age of 25 and sexually active.

– Are over 25 and have sex with more than one person.

– Are over 25 and have a new sexual partner.

– Are pregnant.

IF YOU’RE A MAN

Ask us if you notice a discharge or get a burning sensation in the penis.

If I have Chlamydia, what about my partner?

Your partner may also have chlamydia.

Tell your recent sexual partners to get tested and get treatment.

Avoid sex until 7 days have passed after the start of your treatment, so that you do not infect each other again.

How is Chlamydia treated?

Chlamydia can be treated and cured with antibiotics.

Take all your medicine to make sure it’s healed.

Do not share your medicine with anyone because you need to finish the entire dose.

If you still have symptoms after treatment, talk to your doctor again.

Re-test about three months after treatment is complete. This is particularly important if you are not sure whether your partner was also treated.

How effective is treatment?

The disease tends to remit with conventional antibiotics for this infection, its effectiveness being 99%.

CAN I GET CHLAMYDIA AGAIN AFTER FINISHING MY TREATMENT?

Yes, you may get chlamydia again from a person who has not received treatment or from a new sexual partner.

WHAT IF I DO NOT RECEIVE TREATMENT?

IF YOU’RE A WOMAN

If left untreated, chlamydia can spread to the uterus or fallopian tubes and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a serious infection in the reproductive organs.

PID can cause damage to the fallopian tubes. This damage can cause you to become unpregnant or predispose to an ectopic pregnancy (outside the uterus).

PID can also cause chronic pain in the pelvic area.

If you have chlamydia, you may infect your baby in childbirth. Chlamydia can cause serious health problems in infants.

IF YOU’RE A MAN

Chlamydia rarely causes long-term health problems in men. It can cause an infection in the tube that carries sperm from the testicles. It can also cause pain or fever. In very unusual cases, the infection can cause infertility.

2. Gonorrhea

What is it?

Gonorrhea is a more common sexually transmitted disease. It is caused by a bacterium called Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Anyone who is sexually active can get gonorrhea. It is more common among adolescents and young adults.

Many people who have gonorrhea don’t know it, especially women, because the disease often has no symptoms.

You can spread it to others without your knowledge. Gonorrhea is easy to treat and cure.

If you are not treated for gonorrhea, it can cause serious health problems.

How can I reduce my risk of gonorrhea?

The safest way to avoid gonorrhea is to have sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce your risk of gonorrhea if used appropriately every time you have sex.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted disease.

How do you contract gonorrhea?

You can get gonorrhea by having sex with someone who is infected. “Having sex” means anal, oral or vaginal contact.

If you are pregnant and have gonorrhea, you can spread it to your baby.

What are the symptoms of gonorrhea?

IF YOU’RE A WOMAN

You can get gonorrhea in your anus, eyes, mouth, throat, urinary tract, or uterus. You may not notice any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they will depend on the part of the body affected. If you have gonorrhea in your uterus or urinary tract, you may notice these symptoms:

Vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods.

Pain or burning sensation when urinating.

Increased vaginal discharge.

If you have gonorrhea in your rectum, you may notice these symptoms: itching, pain, blood, discharge from the rectum, or pain when defecating.

If you have gonorrhea in your throat, you may have a sore throat.

IF YOU’RE A MAN

You can get gonorrhea in your anus, eyes, mouth, penis, or throat. You may not notice any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they will depend on the part of the body affected.

If you have gonorrhea in your penis, you may notice these symptoms:

Pain or burning sensation when urinating.

Penis discharge.

Pain or inflammation in the testicles.

If you have gonorrhea in your rectum, you may notice: itching, pain, blood, discharge from the rectum, or pain when defecating.

If you have gonorrhea in your throat, you may have a sore throat.

When should I have an exam?

IF YOU’RE A WOMAN

The gonorrhea test should be done if:

You have some symptoms such as pain or burning when urinating, or abnormal vaginal discharge.

Your partner has gonorrhea or symptoms that may be gonorrhea.

Your partner got another STD, like chlamydia.

If you are pregnant, ask your doctor if you should have the gonorrhea test.

IF YOU’RE A MAN

The gonorrhea test should be done if:

You have penis discharge or pain inside your penis.

You have pain or burning when you urinate.

You have itching, pain, blood or discharge in your rectum, if you are a recipient in anal sex.

Your partner has gonorrhea or symptoms that may be gonorrhea.

Your partner got another STD, like chlamydia.

How do I know if I have gonorrhea?

Ask your doctor to do a specific test for gonorrhea.

What is the treatment for gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea can be treated and cured with antibiotics. With 100% efficiency.

Finish all medications to make sure the infection heals properly.

Do not share your medicines with anyone. You need the full dose.

If you still have symptoms after treatment, return to your doctor.

Can I get gonorrhea again after I finish treatment?

Yes, you can get gonorrhea again from an untreated partner or a new sexual partner.

If I have gonorrhea, what about my partner?

Your partner may also have gonorrhea.

Be sure to tell all your recent sexual partners to get tested and get treatment.

Avoid sex until you and your partner have finished treatment so they don’t become infected again.

What if I don’t get the treatment?

Gonorrhea stays in your body if left untreated. You may have an increased risk of getting HIV if you have unprotected sex with a partner who has the virus. Gonorrhea can also pass into the blood or joints, and this condition can be very serious.

IF YOU’RE A WOMAN

Gonorrhea can pass into the uterus or fallopian tubes and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a serious infection that occurs when gonorrhea passes into the reproductive organs.

Pelvic inflammatory disease can also alter your fertility, decreasing your ability to get pregnant.

If treatment is not received, gonorrhea can cause chronic pain in the pelvis.

If treatment is not received, gonorrhea may spread to your baby at birth and cause serious health problems.

IF YOU’RE A MAN

• Gonorrhea can cause a painful condition in your testicles. In rare cases it may cause infertility.

3. Genital herpes

What is it?

Genital herpes is a virus that is sexually transmitted.

Genital herpes is common in both men and women.

Most people who have genital herpes don’t know, because they often don’t show symptoms.

If you have symptoms, the most common are blisters and painful sores.

You can spread genital herpes to others without knowing it.

There is no cure for genital herpes, but there are treatments for symptoms.

Genital herpes usually doesn’t cause serious health problems.

How can I reduce my risk of genital herpes?

The safest way to avoid genital herpes is to have sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce the risk of genital herpes if used appropriately every time you have sex, but the condom only protects the area of the body it covers, so areas that the condom doesn’t cover can become infected.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted illness.

How do I know if I have genital herpes?

Consult with our doctors. A blood test can help determine if you have genital herpes.

What are the symptoms of genital herpes?

Genital herpes usually has no symptoms. If you have symptoms, you may notice:

Painful blisters or sores on the genitals or anus, or around

of these areas. These blisters heal in two to four weeks.

When the blisters come out, it feels like you’re with a strong flu.

Blisters that appear several times a year. When the blisters come out, it is said that there is an outbreak.

There are two types of genital herpes virus—HSV1 and HSV2. Both types can cause sores or blisters in the genital area.

HSV1 can also cause blisters on the mouth or lips, and are called febrile blisters.

How do you contract genital herpes?

You can get genital herpes by having sex with someone who has the disease. “Having sex” means anal, oral or vaginal sex.

You can also get genital herpes if your genitals touch infected skin or secretions (such as saliva during oral sex) from someone who is infected.

You can get genital herpes even if your partner shows no symptoms of the infection

What can I expect if I have genital herpes?

MEN AND WOMEN

You can expect to have multiple outbreaks a year (usually four or five). In time there will be fewer outbreaks.

You are at increased risk of getting HIV if you have unprotected sex with a person who is infected with HIV.

Knowing that you have genital herpes can make you feel worried or sad, ask us.

PREGNANT WOMEN

Rarely, the infection may pass on to the baby.

If you have active genital herpes at birth, your doctor may decide to proceed to a C-section.

Be sure to tell your doctor if you or your partner has genital herpes.

When should I have an exam?

A test should be done to see if you have genital herpes if:

You have some symptoms (such as a rare sore).

Your partner has genital herpes or symptoms that may be genital herpes.

If I have genital herpes, what about my partner?

Your partner may also have genital herpes.

Tell your recent sexual partners to get tested and get treatment.

Avoid having sex with a person who is not infected when you have visible sores or other symptoms.

Remember that you can infect your partner even if you have no symptoms.

Is there a treatment for genital herpes?

There is no cure for genital herpes, but there are treatments for symptoms.

Some medications can prevent blisters or make them heal faster.

If you have multiple outbreaks in a year, a treatment called daily inhibitory therapy may lower your sexual partner’s risk of spreading the virus.

4. Genital condylomas

What is it?

A condy fibro, refers to an infection of the genitals and there are two types, the acuminate condyloma or genital wart and the flat condy fibro.

How can I reduce my risk of condylomas?

The safest way to avoid genital condyomas is sexual abstinence, or having sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce the risk of genital condy fibroids if used appropriately every time you have sex, but the condom only protects the area of the body it covers, so the areas that the condom doesn’t cover can become infected.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted illness.

How do I know if I have genital condylomas?

By the presence of a wart with a typical cockscomp shape. It presents long and variable incubation periods; Commonly known as condyloma or genital warts, it is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), transmitted through vaginal, anal or oral sex. There are four types of genital warts:

– Acuminate condyloma, which takes the shape of a “cauliflower”.

– 1-4 mm papular warts, soft, usually skin color.

– Keratosic warts, (hard, callous) with a thick cover that resembles the vulgar warts.

– Flat warts that can be flat-centered papules (balls, granites); all of these types of warts can appear in the penis, vagina, vulva, urethra, cervix or anal region; places in the body that have a favorable wet environment for growth and reproduction.

What are the symptoms of genital condylomas?

The main discomforts are stinging, burning, and the sensation of having a foreign body in the genitals.

How do you contract genital condylomas?

You can get genital condymals by having sex with someone who has the disease. “Having sex” means anal, oral or vaginal sex.

You can also get genital condy fibroids if your genitals touch infected skin or secretions (such as saliva during oral sex) from someone who is infected.

You can get genital condy fibroids even if your partner shows no symptoms of infection.

When should I have an exam?

A test should be done to see if you have genital condylomas if:

You have some symptoms (such as a rare wart).

Your partner has genital condylomas or symptoms that may be genital condylomas.

Is there a treatment for genital condylomas?

Surgical treatment by electrofulguration (coagulation) is needed when warts have grown a lot. If they are small, then a topical treatment.

5. Genital HPV infection

What is it?

Genital HPV infection (known as human papillomavirus) is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD). There are more than 40 types of HPV that can infect the genital areas of men and women as well as mouth and throat. Most people who become infected with HPV don’t even know they are.

Clínica Ginecológica Sants informs you that HPV is not the same as genital herpes virus or HIV (the virus that causes AIDS). These STDs are produced by different virus strains with symptoms, signs and health problems of their own. HPV is so common that at least 50% of sexually active women and men contract it at some point in their lives.

How can I reduce my risk of HPV?

The safest way to avoid HPV is to have sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce the risk of HPV if used appropriately every time you have sex, but the condom only protects the area of the body it covers, so areas that the condom doesn’t cover can become infected.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted disease.

What are the signs, symptoms, and possible health problems that HPV can cause?

Most people infected with HPV have no symptoms or health problems from infection because in 90% of cases the body’s immune system naturally eliminates HPV within two years. In cases that are not eliminated by the immune system HPV may cause:

  • Genital warts.
  • Rarely, warts in the throat.
  • Cervical cancer and other less common but serious cancers, such as vulva, vagina, penis, anus and oropharyngeal cavity cancer.

The types of HPV that can cause genital warts are not the same as those that cause cancer. There’s no way to know which people with HPV will have cancer or other health problems.

Signs and symptoms of HPV-related health problems:

Genital warts usually appear as a small bump or group of bumps in the genital area. They can be small or large, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower. Health care providers can diagnose warts by looking at the genital area during an office visit. Warts can appear within weeks or months after sexual contact with an infected partner—even if the infected partner has no signs of genital warts. If left untreated, genital warts might go away, remain unchanged, or increase in size or number. They will not turn into cancer.

Cervical cancer: You usually don’t have symptoms until you’re at an advanced stage. For this reason, it is important that women are regularly screened for cervical cancer for this purpose. At ClĂ­nica GinecolĂłgica Sants it is recommended to have a CYTOLOGY (cervical) as soon after the first sexual relationship. This test can identify early signs of the disease to be treated early, before they develop into cancer.

Other HPV-related cancers: May not have signs or symptoms until they are advanced and difficult to treat. This includes cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus and cancer of the oropharyngeal cavity.

How is HPV contracted?

HPV is transmitted through genital contact, most often through vaginal and sex. HPV can also be transmitted through oral sexual intercourse and genital contact. HPV can be transmitted between heterosexual and gay (gay) couples, even if the infected partner has no signs or symptoms.

A person may have HPV until years after having sexual contact with an infected partner. Most infected people do not know that they are infected or that they are transmitting the virus to their sexual partner. It is also possible to contract more than one type of HPV.

In very few cases, a pregnant woman with genital HPV can transmit the virus to her baby during childbirth.

How does HPV cause genital warts and cancer?

HPV can cause normal cells in infected skin to become abnormal. Most of the time, these changes in cells cannot be seen or felt. In most cases, the body naturally fights HPV and infected cells return to normal. But when the body doesn’t eliminate HPV, the virus can cause visible changes such as genital warts or cancer. Warts may appear weeks or months after getting HPV. The cancer usually takes years to develop after HPV is contracted.

How can HPV-related diseases be prevented?

1. Primary Prevention:

-HPV vaccination available.
-Free universal vaccination in school for girls aged 11 to 12 years.

TETRAVALENT VACCINE

  • This vaccine has been indicated to be adminestered to women from the age of 9.
  • For the prevention of precancerous lesions and cervical, vulvar, vaginal and cancers caused by HPV oncogenic types included in the vaccine (HPV 16 and HPV 18) and genital warts caused by HPV types 6 and 11.
  • It does not contain genetic material, therefore it cannot cause disease.
  • It can be given to girls/boys aged 9 to 15 years and women aged 16 to 26
  • Series of 3 doses over a period of 6 months. Intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle of the arm.
  • 3 Dosage:
    • 1st dose month 0
    • 2d dose month 2
    • 3rd dose month 6
What can be done?

2. Secondary Prevention:

-Cervical cytology to detect preneoplastic lesions.
-Determination of papillomavirus (cause of disease).

Is there an HPV screening test?

HPV screening available on the market is only used to evaluate women at a certain age who have had specific results on their Pap tests for cervical cancer. There is no general test for men or women to detect whether a person has HPV, nor is there an approved HPV screening test for HPV in the genitals, mouth or throat.

Are there treatments for HPV or HPV-related diseases?

There is no treatment for the virus, but there are treatments for diseases that HPV can cause:

Visible genital warts can be removed by the patient himself with the use of prescription medications, or if he goes to the doctor for treatment. Some people prefer not to treat warts, to see if they go away on their own. No treatment is better than the other.

Cervical cancer can be more easily treated if diagnosed and treated in its early stages. However, a woman who is regularly tested for Pap smears and has proper follow-up can identify problems before the cancer appears. Prevention is always preferable to treatment.

Other HPV-related cancers can also be more easily treated if diagnosed and treated in early stages.

6. HIV/AIDS

What is it?

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. HIV is a virus that kills or damages cells in the body’s immune system.

AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the most advanced stage of HIV infection.

How can I reduce my risk of HIV/AIDS?

The safest way to avoid HIV/AIDS is sexual abstinence, or having sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce the risk of getting HIV/AIDS if used appropriately every time you have sex, but the condom only protects the area of the body it covers, so that areas that the condom does not cover can become infected.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted disease.

Clínica Ginecológica Sants recommends testing for HIV people who have been diagnosed with STDs or believe they have an STD because people infected with STDs are at least two to five times more likely to get HIV, if they are exposed to the virus through sexual contact, than people who are not infected.

How do I know if I have HIV/AIDS?

Consult with our doctors. A blood test can help determine if you have HIV/AIDS.

How do I get HIV/AIDS?

HIV is often spread through unprotected sex with an infected person. AIDS can also be spread by sharing needles or by entering in contact with the blood of an infected person. Women can pass it on to their babies during pregnancy or childbirth.

Early signs of HIV/AIDS?

The first signs of HIV infection may include ganglion inflammation and flu symptoms. They may occur and disappear a month or two after infection. Severe symptoms may not appear until months or years.

Is there a treatment for HIV/AIDS?

There is no cure, but there are many medicines to fight HIV infection and other infections and cancers that accompany it. People can live with the disease for many years.

7. Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV)

What are they?

They are viral diseases that affect the liver, can be chronicified and evolve in some cases into liver cirrhosis or liver cancer. The carrier usually has no or nonspecific symptoms, such as tiredness. In tests, transaminases tend to be elevated. More than 50% of people with HBV and HCV are unaware that they are.

How can I reduce my risk of hepatitis B or C?

The safest way to avoid HBV or HCV is sexual abstinence, or having sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce the risk of HBV or HCV if used appropriately every time you have sex, but the condom only protects the area of the body it covers, so areas that the condom does not cover can become infected.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex won’t prevent any sexually transmitted disease

Use caution when performing tattoos, pyrcings, acupuncture in centers that do not comply with health regulations.

Do not share syringes or tubes to inhale or snort drugs.

Do not use blood-infected instruments such as personal hygiene utensils such as contaminated razors.

How do I know if I have HBV or HCV?

Consult with our doctors. A blood test can help determine if you have HBV or HCV.

Is there a treatment for HBV or HCV?

There is no cure, but there are many medicines to fight HBV or HCV infection and other infections and cancers that accompany it. HcV prognosis is reserved however some cases the person can live many years with the infection.

8. Syphilis

What is syphilis?

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a spirochete that is a type of bacterium called Treponema pallidum.

How do you contract syphilis?

Syphilis is passed from person to person through direct contact with a syphilistic ulcer. Ulcers appear mainly on the external genitalia, vagina, anus, or rectum. They can also come out on the lips and mouth. Bacterial transmission occurs during vaginal,, or oral sex. Pregnant women who have this disease can pass it on to babies in their womb. Syphilis is not spread by contact with toilets, door handles, swimming pools, regular or hot tubs, or by sharing clothing or cutlery.

What are the signs and symptoms?

Many people who have syphilis have no symptoms for years, but still face the risk of complications in the advanced phase if the disease is not treated. People who are in the primary or secondary phase of the disease transmit the infection even if siphilic ulcers often cannot be recognized. Therefore, people who do not know they are infected can spread the disease.

Three phases are differentiated according to disease evolution and disease severity.

How is syphilis diagnosed?

Through a blood test that determines the antibodies produced by the person in contact with the bacteria. It can also be diagnosed from the liquid of the ulcers of the chancre (primary lesion) by direct observation of the bacteria under a dark field microscope

How does syphilis relate to HIV?

Genital ulcers (chancros) caused by syphilis make it easier to contract HIV infection and pass it sexually. The risk of HIV infection is estimated to be 2 to 5 times higher when the person exposed to the virus has syphilis.

What is the treatment of syphilis?

Syphilis is easy to cure in its early stages. If a person has had syphilis for less than a year, the disease will be cured with a single intramuscular injection of penicillin, which is an antibiotic, and if they have had syphilis for more than a year, they will need additional doses. Other antibiotics are available to treat syphilis in people who are allergic to penicillin. Syphilis cannot be cured with home remedies or medicines sold without a prescription. Treatment will kill the bacteria that cause syphilis and prevent future injuries, but will not remedy the injuries already caused.

Since there is effective treatment for syphilis, it is important that people are regularly screened for this disease if they engage in sexual behaviors that put them at risk of STDs.

People dealing with syphilis should refrain from having sexual contacts with new partners until syphilis ulcers have completely healed. People who have syphilis should immediately notify their partners to undergo testing and treatment if necessary.

Is syphilis recurring?

The fact that a person has had syphilis once does not protect them from having it again. A person may still be susceptible to reinfection even if he or she has been cured with treatment. Only lab tests can confirm whether a person has syphilis. Because syphilis ulcers may be hidden in the vagina, rectum or mouth, a person may not know that their sexual partner has syphilis. Your doctor will help you determine if new syphilis screening is needed after treatment is complete.

How can syphilis be prevented?

The safest way to avoid developing sexually transmitted diseases, including syphilis, is to abstain from sexual contact or have a stable, mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and is known to have no infection.

Refraining from alcohol and drugs can also help prevent the transmission of syphilis, as these activities can lead to dangerous sexual behavior. It is important for sexual partners to talk to each other about whether they have HIV or whether they have had other STDs in the past so that they can take preventive action.

Ulcerative genital diseases, such as syphilis, can occur in both male and female genital areas that have been covered or protected with a latex condom, as well as in areas that were not covered during sexual intercourse. Proper and regular use of latex condoms can reduce the risk of getting syphilis, genital herpes and chancros, only if the infected area or possible contact area is covered.

Transmission of an STD, including syphilis, cannot be prevented from washing your genitals, urinating or taking a vaginal shower after intercourse. Any discharge, ulcer or abnormal irritation, particularly in the groin area, should be considered as a sign to stop having sex and consult your doctor immediately.

9. Trichomoniasis

What is trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD), produced by a parasite (flagellated protozoa) called Trichomona which parasites both men’s and women’s urogenital tract. Symptoms of this disease are more common in women.

How common is trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis is the curable STD that most often affects young sexually active women.

How do you get trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis is caused by the single-celled protozoa Trichomonas vaginalis. The vagina is the most common place where infection occurs in women while in men it is in the urethra (urinary duct).

The parasite is transmitted through sexual intercourse with an infected partner either through contact between the penis and vagina or by contact from vulva to vulva (genital area on the outside of the vagina). Women can get this disease from a man or woman who has the infection, but men usually get it only through contact with infected women.

What are the signs and symptoms?

Most men with trichomoniasis have no signs or symptoms, but some may have temporary irritation inside the penis, mild discharge, or a little burning after urinating or ejaculating.

Some women have symptoms or signs of infection that include frothy, greenish-yellow vaginal discharge with a strong odor. The infection can also cause discomfort during intercourse or urination, as well as irritation and itching in the woman’s genital area. In very unusual cases there may be pain in the lower belly. Symptoms in women usually appear 5 to 28 days after exposure to infection.

What are the complications of trichomoniasis?

The genital inflammation caused by trichomoniasis can increase a woman’s susceptibility to HIV infection if she is exposed to this virus. The chance that a woman with HIV will pass the virus to her sexual partner (or sexual partners) increases if she has trichomoniasis.

How is trichomoniasis diagnosed?

To diagnose trichomoniasis in both men and women, your doctor must perform a physical exam and a lab test. The parasite is harder to detect in men than in women. In women, the pelvic exam may reveal the presence of small red ulcers (sores) on the walls of the vagina or cervix.

What is the treatment of trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis is usually cured with prescription medications. Symptoms of trichomoniasis in infected men may go away within a few weeks without any treatment. However, an infected man who has never had symptoms or his symptoms have disappeared may continue to infect or reinfecte his female sexual partner as long as the infection is not treated. Therefore, both in the couple should treat the infection at the same time to remove the parasite. People who are being treated for trichomoniasis should avoid having sex until they and their partners have finished treatment and have no symptoms.

Just because a person has had trichomoniasis once doesn’t mean they can’t get it back. A person may still be susceptible to reinfection even if he or she has completed treatment.

How is trichomoniasis prevented?

The safest way to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases is to abstain from sexual contact, or to have a stable, mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been screened and known to have no infection.

Latex condoms for men, when used regularly and correctly, can reduce the risk of transmission of trichomoniasis.

Any symptoms in the genital area, such as discharge or burning when urinating, unusual sore or irritation, should be reason to stop sex and consult a doctor immediately. A person who has been diagnosed with trichomoniasis (or any other STD) should be treated and alert everyone they have recently had sex with so that they also consult a doctor and can be treated. This reduces the risk of sexual partners having complications from trichomoniasis and the risk of re-infection in people who have had the parasite. A person with trichomoniasis and all of their recent sexual partners should stop having sex to be treated for infection and wait for symptoms to go away.

10. Bacterial vaginosis

What is bacterial vaginosis?

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the name given to a condition that occurs in women, in which the normal bacterial balance in the vagina is altered and instead certain bacteria grow excessively. Occasionally, it is accompanied by vaginal discharge, odor, pain, itching or burning.

How common is bacterial vaginosis?

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in women of childbearing age. Bacterial vaginosis often occurs among pregnant women.

How do you get bacterial vaginosis?

The cause of bacterial vaginosis is not ticeslessly known. BV is associated with an imbalance in the amount of bacteria normally found in a woman’s vagina. Normally, most bacteria in the vagina are “good,” but there are also a few bacteria that are “harmful.” BV occurs when there is an increase in the number of harmful bacteria.

Not much is known about how women get bacterial vaginosis. There are still many questions for which no answers have been found about the role of harmful bacteria as the cause of BV. Any woman can get bacterial vaginosis.

However, some activities or behaviors such as the following alter the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina and expose a woman to an increased risk of contracting BV.

  • Having a new sexual partner or multiple sexual partners.
  • Use vaginal showers.

The role of sexual activity in the onset of BV is unclear. Women do not contract bacterial vaginosis by contact with toilets, bedding, swimming pools, or by touching objects around them. Women who have never had sex can also develop this infection.

What are the signs and symptoms of bacterial vaginosis?

Women with BV may have abnormal vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor. Some women develop a strong smell of fish, especially after having sex. If present, the vaginal discharge is usually white or gray and may be slightly thick. Women with BV may also feel burning when urinating or itching on the outside of the vagina or both. However, most women indicate that they have no signs or symptoms.

What are the complications of bacterial vaginosis?

In most cases, bacterial vaginosis does not cause complications; however, BV can expose women to serious risks such as:

BV may increase a woman’s susceptibility to HIV infection if she is exposed to HIV infection.

BV increases the likelihood that a woman with HIV will pass this virus on to her sexual partner.

BV can increase a woman’s susceptibility to other STDs, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV), chlamydia infection, and gonorrhea.

How is bacterial vaginosis diagnosed?

Your doctor should examine your vagina for signs of bacterial vaginosis and take a sample of your vaginal discharge for laboratory tests for bacteria associated with BV.

What is the treatment of bacterial vaginosis?

Although bacterial vaginosis sometimes goes away without treatment, every woman with SYMPTOMs of BV should be treated to avoid complications. It is usually not necessary to treat the male sexual partner. However, BV can be transmitted between female sexual partners.

All women with symptoms of BV should be screened and treated.

BV is treated with antibiotics prescribed by a doctor. Two different antibiotics are recommended for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Any of the antibiotics can be used in both pregnant and non-pregnant women, but depending on the case different doses are recommended, consult with your doctor.

How can bacterial vaginosis be prevented?

Scientists don’t fully understand BV; therefore, the best ways to prevent it are not known. However, BV is known to be associated with having a new sexual partner or multiple sexual partners.

The following basic prevention steps can help reduce the risk of altering the natural balance of bacteria in the vagina and the onset of BV:

Practice sexual abstinence.

Limit the number of sexual partners.

Don’t take vaginal showers.

Take all prescribed medication to treat BV, even if the signs and symptoms have disappeared.

11. Candidiasis

Candida is an infection caused by a fungus (mycosis) of any of the candida species.

How can I reduce my risk of candidiasis?

The safest way to avoid thrush is sexual abstinence, or having sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Condoms can reduce your risk of getting thrush if used appropriately every time you have sex.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted illness.

What are the signs and symptoms?

Thrush is a very common cause of vaginal irritation, or vaginitis, and can also occur in the male genitalia. In immunocompromised patients (decreased defenses), candida infections can affect the esophagus with the potential to become systemic.

How is thrush diagnosed?

Diagnosis of a yeast infection is made through a microscopic examination or cultures.

Do you have treatment?

Yes, conventional antifungals orally and/or topically.

12. What are crabs?

It is an ecteroparasite, round, flattened and yellowish. It is also called pubic lice that has a propensity for hair follicles (hair root).

How can I reduce my risk of getting crabs?

Transmission is done in most cases through sexual contact, although it can rarely occur when wearing garments that have been in contact with a carrier. In addition to the pubic region, they can also be placed in the hair, eyebrows, eyelashes, and axillary and body hair (of the legs and arms, for example).

The safest way to avoid crabs is sexual abstinence, or having sex with someone who is not infected and who only has sex with you.

Washing your genitals, urinating or taking vaginal showers after sex will not prevent any sexually transmitted illness.

What are the signs and symptoms?

The crabs feed on blood at least twice a day, causing a very annoying itching that can cause the infected to scratch causing skin irritation and infection.

Do you have treatment?

There are creams, shampoos and lotions that contain gamma benzene hexachloride or permethrin and are equally effective while used correctly, among other measures.

5. How can I know if I have an STD?

We recommend you to make an appointment at Clínica Ginecológica Sants where qualified medical personnel who will solve any questions on the first visit. The doctor will then perform personalized specific tests and tests the different types of STDs (Sexually Transmitted Disease) as appropriate.

At ClĂ­nica GinecolĂłgica Sants we have SPECIAL and economic PRICES based on a battery of tests that covers the vast majority of STDs.

6. How long is the visit?

At Clínica Ginecológica Sants you will be given a personalized treatment. The first visit lasts on average 25 minutes per patient. On this first visit the doctor will perform a general examination, answer all your questions and tell you which treatment to follow.

Call us to make an appointment for STD Testing in Barcelona.

7. Prices

The first medical visit costs 50 euros. ClĂ­nica GinecolĂłgica Sants offers batteries of tests for each type of STD with very economical prices, in a personalized and private way.

In addition, Clínica Ginecológica Sants has SPECIAL PRICES based on a battery of tests that covers the vast majority of most common STDs, in a fast, safe and personalized way. 

Check our prices on STD Testing in Barcelona.

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Opening hours

Monday - Friday 8am - 8pm

Saturday 8am - 2pm

More info

Logo Clinica Sants

ClĂ­nica GinecolĂłgica Sants

Calle de Roger, 23
08028 Barcelona

Opening hours

Monday - Friday  8am - 8pm

Saturday 8am - 2pm

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